Articles Blog

Four Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Be Scared of Adoption

In spite of recent trends highly favoring open adoption, as well as abundant evidence proving the happiness and health of adopted kids, many women facing unplanned pregnancy still experience anxiety at the thought of making an adoption plan. Despite its stigma, adoption may have lower risks and higher rewards than other options and can leave you more confident than fearful about your child’s future as well as your own.

1. Most Adoptions Are Open
A 2012 survey by the Evan B. Donald Adoption Institute, reported in the Washington Times, surveyed over 4,400 domestic adoptions from over 100 agencies, and found that 95 percent of US infant adoptions are now open. Fifty-five percent of these were “fully disclosed,” with regular, face-to-face contact, and 40 percent were “mediated,” where contact is maintained through e-mails, letters, and photos, and only 5 percent were “closed,” where adoptive parents were not provided with information about the birth parents beyond medical data. While an open adoption allows birth parents to feel secure in their child’s happiness and well-being, it also provides the adoptee with a sense of certainty about their past and support for the future. Most birth mothers feel comfort and delight when they receive regular news of achievements at school or new friends made or are able to observe their child’s progress in person.

2. Most Adopted Kids Are Happy
A report in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services surveyed over 2,000 families that adopted children domestically, internationally, or from foster care. “Adoption USA” found that over 85 percent of adopted children are in excellent or good health, and were more likely to have health insurance than most American kids. They were also found to be more likely to read each day and be more involved in extracurricular activities than children in the general population. Many adoptive parents have been eager to create a family for years, and are bursting to shower their new child with the gifts and affection he or she needs to grow up healthy and well-adjusted.

3. There is Low Financial Stress
While the details vary from state to state, most adoptive parents can pay a birth mother’s reasonable medical, legal, and counseling services associated with the adoption. Living expenses could include rent, food, maternity clothing, and transportation during the adoption plan, and the birth mother can be reimbursed in most cases.

4. There are Resources and Hope
As with any pregnancy that does not end in parenting, birth mothers can experience emotions such as confusion and loss. There are countless counselors, books, podcasts, and support groups that can help you make peace with your past and embrace the future. Focusing on the advantages your child has in their new home, as well as your own goals and dreams that are facilitated by the adoption plan, will create a healthy path for you to navigate toward your destiny.